Comparative Photos Show Rocky Intertidal Changes Between 2013 and 2016

With the last bout of sea star wasting syndrome eastern Pacific starfish took a big hit. I describe the progression at this intertidal site in A Peek at Pisaster After Two Years of Sea Star Wasting Syndrome. After three years their numbers are still down. Removal experiments have shown we can expect changes in rocky…

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Before and After Sea Star Wasting Syndrome: Three Comparative Photos Show Rapid Changes in the Rocky Intertidal

The most recent bout of sea star wasting syndrome has been with us on the west coast for a couple of years. It’s worth asking if we see any changes in rocky intertidal communities. Below, I show three pairs of photos from a single site in northern Oregon. The first photo in each pair is…

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A Peek at Pisaster After Two Years of Sea Star Wasting Syndrome

It’s a good time to check in on the rocky intertidal. All along the west coast sea star wasting syndrome has, to varying degrees, reduced Pisaster ochraceus, a potent predator and organizing force in rocky intertidal communities. Generations of intertidal ecologists, students, fisherpeople and other harvesters, tide poolers, and beachcombers have grown to count on…

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Sea Stars and Sand Dollars

The low tides, especially those below mean lower low water (0.0′), afford an opportunity to observe Pisaster ochraceus, wherever rocky outcrops jut from the sand. On the exposed coast, P. ochraceus need to stay attached to rocks. They are slow-movers but they get around, maneuvering up and down on their rock as the tides rise and fall. I…

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