Flickr Picked My Photo for Its World Oceans Day 2017 Gallery!

Flickr just told me they picked my photo for their World Oceans Day 2017 Gallery! This photo previously appeared in Solving the Connection Conundrum in the Rocky Intertidal, September 6, 2015. World Oceans Day 2017 is Thursday, June 8. Celebrate our oceans by enjoying Flickr’s World Oceans Day 2017 Gallery.

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Perched Atop Pollicipes, Lottia digitalis is a Work of Camouflage

In the image below, barnacles cloak a vertical wall rising above a sand filled tide pool. You’ll encounter scenes like this on exposed coastlines around the world, wherever there is a rocky intertidal. Here, the barnacles are goose barnacles, Pollicipes polymerus. Look for them where surf crashes against jutting rocks and headlands. Take a closer…

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Calling Up Connections

It’s been a good year for barnacles and bay mussels. Billows of goose barnacles, Pollicipes polymerus, proliferated freely. Blue mussels, Mytilus trossulus, a delicacy for predators, settled abundantly out of the plankton. Adult acorn barnacles, Balanus glandula, grew so fast they crowded each other off the rocks creating open space for recruits. To maintain balance in the face these…

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Stranded Greenling Raises Eternal Question: To Assist or Not Assist?

Last week, thanks to a good low tide, I got to explore a stand of Ahnfeltiopsis. The surf was bigger than I wished, but the grove was upon me, and my attention was on the sand-loving red algae people call forked seaweed. While I was solving seaweeds, the swash left a 75 mm prize flopping…

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Spongy Cushion, Codium setchellii

Every time I come across a patch of Codium setchellii I have to pause and take a closer look. The marvelous convolutions of greenish-black spongy cushion evoke feelings like no other algae. It’s a visceral thing – hard to explain. I haven’t discussed it with anyone, but I know I’m not the only one who…

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Keyhole Limpets on the Beach

I took the photo shown above in dim early morning light on February 21, 2015. Keyhole limpet shells on the beach is not an unusual thing. Rough keyhole limpets, Diodora aspera, (along with whitecaps, Acmaea mitra) are the most common intact limpet shells found on the surf-swept sandy beaches of northern Oregon. There are plenty…

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