When I’m exploring the outer shores, it’s all about the tides. What it feels like, what you see, even your safety, are all dependent on the tides.  I took this photo on October 18, 2009, a little after high tide. High tide was 9.5′, a pretty high tide. I remember wanting to make sure I didn’t get stuck on the wrong side of this tight corner. Any tide over 10.0′ is really high and any high tide below 6.5′ is a really low high tide.  The highest high tides usually occur in late fall or winter; low high tides are most frequent in spring and summer.

2 thoughts

  1. ok, I’ll bite… why are they higher in winter, and lower in summer? I’m trying to imagine a grapefruit and a ping pong ball moving around it to figure this out… I know basically what happens to the planet wrt the sun in different seasons, I get longer days in summer/shorter in winter (and why Christmas is scorching hot Down Under), but I’m not able to figure out what happens to the moon’s orbit in different seasons.

    Help me get this. I need to explain it to my kidlets. My daughter saw the moon tonight, informed me that it’s a full moon, and that it would “get smaller, and then bigger again, and do it all over again”. She’s been listening!! Yay!!

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