Dodecaceria, Cropped

This mound is home to a colony of marine worms, Dodecaceria, probably D. fewkesi. Here, the worms have retreated, it being low tide, into their calcareous tubes. Their tubes are embedded in a matrix of cemented sand particles. When the tide returns, they’ll poke their tentacled heads out to feed. A version of the photograph…

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Construction on the Coast

No permit required. At the edge of a low tidepool a colony of tube-dwelling worms has created a new mound of calcareous tubes and cemented sand. Bioconstruction adds structure and mass to rocky shores. The mound is rock-like to the touch. Below, at the edge of the same small pool, more bioconstruction. I imagine these…

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A Twist of Serpula Tubes

Larval calcareous tubeworms start out life in the plankton- it’s a badge of honor among tide pool inhabitants. Once they settle, young worms secrete calcareous tubes within which they reside for the rest of their lives. Below, six or seven red trumpets, Serpula columbiana, have laid down loose coils around a giant barnacle shell, Balanus…

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Northern Feather-Duster Worm

Balancing precariously on the edge of a crevice above a rarely exposed and kind of spooky low tidepool, I came eyeball to photosensitive eyespot with this impressive clump of Eudistylia vancouveri. Not true – I came eyeball to parchment tube – the actual worms (eyespots and all) withdrew with the falling tide, and by the…

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